Sunday, March 5, 2017

WallTrek links English teachers with jobs in Asia

3/05/2017

English has long been the lingua franca of international business. And as China and other Asian nations expand their roles in global commerce, the demand for people to teach English abroad is growing at a comparable pace.

According to the British Council, the number people using and learning English worldwide will grow from 1.7 billion in 2015 to 2 billion by 2020. That means that the demand for people who can teach English as a foreign language will also increase at a rapid rate.

A Chinese startup called WallTrek has created a new service that promises to quickly connect teachers to job openings in China as well as Thailand, Vietnam and other Asian countries.

Users of the WallTrek website fill out a form that includes a description of their dream job. “Submit your resume, go through the interview process, and in less than 10 days we will contact you with an offer,” the site says. “Our matchmaking system helps you find the perfect company, all while operating in real-time.”

WallTrek also its advanced candidate searching tools and video interviews will speed up the hiring process for schools and institutions that have open teaching positions. While many Americans and  English teachers from other countries take jobs in China, they typically stay no more than a year or two. That leads to constant turnover in teaching jobs and a continuing demand for more applicants.

An ideal candidates at WallTrek would be 24 or older and a native English speaker or non-native with excellent English. They would also have a Bachelor's degree, at least two years of full-time work experience and an EFL teaching certificate.

For more details, visit the WallTrek website and check out the video below. You can also follow @walltrek on Twitter and Facebook.





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Follow me on Twitter @ricmanning and read my technology columns at My Well Being.

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