Monday, August 3, 2020

Reputation manager says it fights back

8/03/2020

The Internet is like a mammoth library that never runs out of shelves. The newspaper story about the time you scored a winning touchdown way back in high school? It's there for someone to find. But so is the report on your DWI arrest.

Individuals generally have scant success when they try to get negative online information removed. But professional services like SearchResults.Repair have built a thriving business making negative information either disappear or become much harder to find.

SearchResults.Repair focuses on the negative online information such as past criminal records, negative new articles and unfair reviews that can damage a business or prevent someone from getting hired.

The service was created by Wesley Upchurch, a web designer and Internet marketer who says he's "on a mission to make the web a more useful and more beautiful place." Here's how he describes his company's approach:

We seek to restore our clients online image through every available means. We believe that people’s past mistakes should not forever define their person.

SearchResults.Repair uses a direct approach to get data removed from widely-used background check sites such as Checkmate, TruthFinder, and US Search. The company says it also has success with more resistant databases like LexisNexis, Radaris, Spokeo and others.

When it runs into roadblocks, SearchResults.Repair can harness its publishing channels to pepper the Internet with articles that give a positive view of their clients. Those stories help rewrite a client's digital history while pushing negative items farther down in search results.

To get a closer look at SeachResults.Repair, visit the company's websiteFacebook page, and Instagram portfolio and follow @searchresultsr on Twitter.






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Follow me on Twitter @ricmanning and read my technology columns at My Well Being.

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